Stone Creek Tunnel (Cleveland & Marietta Railway)

The Stone Creek Tunnel is located along the former Cleveland & Marietta Railway (C&M) in Stone Creek, Ohio. Built in 1874, the tunnel was taken out of service in May 1976.

The C&M’s earliest predecessor is the Marietta & Pittsburg Railroad, formed on September 29, 1868 2 with the goal of connecting Marietta and Dennison.4 The mainline was constructed from Marietta north to Macksburg in 1871, and to Newcomerstown and Canal Dover (Dover) in June 1874.2 6  On December 7, 1873, the company was reorganized to the Marietta, Pittsburg & Cleveland Railway.2 It was put into receivership on August 5, 1875, reincorporating on May 29, 1879 as the Cleveland & Marietta Railroad (C&M). The C&M made an arrangement in September 1882 to use the Cleveland & Pittsburgh Railroad (C&P) from Canal Dover to Zoar.1 The railroad was quitclaimed in April 1883; one-third was allocated to the Junction & Terminal property at Valley Junction while two-thirds went to the W≤2 the entirely of the C&M was then operated as a branch of the W&LE.1

The railroad was once again in receivership on February 2, 1885, where it was reorganized on July 2, 1886 as the Cleveland & Marietta Railway (C&M).2 The C&M eventually became a part of the Pennsylvania Railroad’s Marietta Branch (PRR). In 1968, the PRR merged with the New York Central (NYC) to form the Penn Central Railroad (PC).3 In 1976, PC became part of Conrail and on May 1, 1976, the last train rolled over the line from Marietta to Dover.

Sources
  1. Titchenal, Stephen. Wheeling & Lake Erie Railroad History. N.p.: n.p., 2014. Print.
  2. “Cleveland and Marietta Railway Company.” Ohio Railway Report 1860’s History. Web. 22 Feb. 2016.
  3. “History of the Byesville Scenic Railway.” Byesville Scenic Railway. 2010. Web. 24 Feb. 2016. Article.
  4. “Photos of Yesteryear.” Byesville Scenic Railway. 2010. Web. 1 Mar. 2016. Article.

5 Replies to “Stone Creek Tunnel (Cleveland & Marietta Railway)”

    1. Get off at the Stone Creek exit of I77( SR 751). Head south on it and just past a lumber company, the tunnel will be on your left. Not sure about the private property or not. Supposed to be part of a rail trail in future.

    1. I would like to know more about this tunnel, Greg. My family story is that my great-great-grandfather’s cabin was at the south end of the tunnel. Is the south end accessible, and can it be done without having to go through the tunnel itself?

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